About ISHIB


Other Milestones in ISHIB’s History

1986 ISHIB founded, with Neil B. Shulman, MD serving as chairman of the board of trustees, Elijah Saunders, MD as president, and W. Dallas Hall, MD as secretary and treasurer.
 
1987 ISHIB establishes the Distinguished Researcher, Distinguished Young Researcher, and Outstanding Community Service Awards to recognize those who have advanced the knowledge base and patient care related to hypertension and cardiovascular disease.
 
1988-1993 ISHIB office space provided through Emory University located on Butler Street, Atlanta, Georgia.
 
1991 ISHIB publishes first volume of Ethnicity & Disease.
 
1992 Appointment of James W. Reed, MD as president of the Society.
 
May 1993 ISHIB conducts its first Worship Site Blood Pressure Education Program as its healthcare professionals address church congregations to offer blood pressure information and screenings.
 
1993 ISHIB establishes the Rosa Parks Award to recognize organizations and individuals who have made significant contributions in reducing the morbidity and mortality rate caused by hypertension in ethnic populations.
 
1993 Purchase and opening of ISHIB’s headquarters located at 2045 Manchester Street, NE; Atlanta, Georgia.
 
1994 Kermit G. Payne appointed ISHIB’s executive director.
 
1994 Release of monograph publication, Emerging Perspectives in Hypertension: Focus on the African-American Patient.
 
1995 Release of monograph publication, AII: A Target in Hypertensive Disease in African-American Patients.
 
1996 ISHIB participates in the Accupril Titration Interval Management Evaluation (ATIME) Clinical Trial. 1996 ISHIB launches the Calcium Antagonists in Blacks Clinical Trial.
 
1996 ISHIB conducts the seminar series: Summit on the Use of ACE Inhibitors in African-American Hypertensives.
 
1997 Release of monograph publication, Meet the Experts: Effective Use of Combination Drug Therapy in the Treatment of Minority Hypertensive Populations.
 
1997 Release of monograph publication, The Effective Use of Calcium Antagonists.
 
1998 ISHIB participates in the TevetenĀ® Clinical Trial.
 
1998 Release of monograph publication, Expert Panel: On the Effective Use of Low-Dose Combination Therapy in African-American Patients.
 
1998 ISHIB conducts the seminar series: The Role of Renin-Angiotensin Aldosterone Systems in Hypertension and Target Organ Injury in African Americans.
 
1999 ISHIB participates in the newly organized consortium announced by US Surgeon General David Satcher, ” The Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease Initiative for African Americans: Eliminating Health Disparities.” The consortium is a collaborative effort among health associations, health industry leaders, and local communities.
 
2000 ISHIB conducts the seminar series: Cardiovascular Disease: A Unified Model – Treating the Urban Ethnic Patient
 
2003 ISHIB releases Landmark Guidelines to Raise Bar for Treatment of African Americans with High Blood Pressure
 
2003 ISHIB Board of Trustees appoints Christopher T. Fitzpatrick as new Chief Executive Officer
2004 ISHIB moves to the Historic Herndon Plaza in Atlanta. This building is named for Alonzo Herndon, an ex-slave who went on to found the Atlanta Life Insurance Company and became Atlanta’s first African-American millionaire.
 
2004 ISHIB Board of Trustees appoints new President, Charles L. Curry, MD; Secretary/Treasurer, Shawna D. Nesbitt, MD; new board members: Clarence E. Grim, MD; Sandra Harris-Hooker, PhD; and Keith C. Norris, MD.
 
2005 ISHIB Appoints Kenneth Jamerson, MD, as Vice President; elects new board members: Brent M. Egan, MD; James A. Gavin, III, MD, PhD; David S. Kountz, MD; and Janice P. Lea, MD.
2006 ISHIB conducts 2nd Clinical Update.
2007 ISHIB supports Katrina victims through HTN neighborhood initiatives.
2010 ISHIB conducts Regional Symposia for medical professionals in Baltimore, MD, Charleston, SC and Dallas, TX.
2010 ISHIB publishes Consensus Statement in Hypertension: Journal of the American Heart Association. High blood pressure in African-Americans is such a serious health problem that treatment should start sooner and be more aggressive.